January 27, 2017: John Wesley and the Methodist Movement at English History Fiction Authors

March 14, 2016: Possibility of Death: a memoir published at Conversations On Dying by Phil Dwyer

Feb. 29, 2016:   782 Bermuda: a short story published at The Litter I See Project

Feb. 13 2016:  Memoir and Creative Nonfiction: a mini workshop by Gwen Tuinman (hosted by The Writers’ Community of Durham Region at The Durham College Centre for Food)

Jan. 2016:  Cryssa Bazos interview:  Word Weaver Jan./Feb.2016 issue

December 2015:  Confectionery Courtship: Winner of Best Overall Creative Fiction in The Robert McLaughlin Art Gallery’s ‘Their Stories’ competition

Nov. 2015:  Rebel Miller interview:  Word Weaver Nov./Dec. 2015 issue

Sept. 4, 2015:   Setting: Not Just a Pretty Place: a workshop about the elements of setting by Gwen Tuinman and Cryssa Bazos (hosted at Station Art Gallery in Whitby, Ontario)

Sept. 2015: Tom Taylor interview: Word Weaver Sept./Oct. 2015 issue

Aug. 2015:  Kylie Burns interview: Word Weaver July/Aug. 2015 issue

April 16, 2015:  Drawing Words from Art: a workshop about using art as a writing prompt by Gwen Tuinman and Cryssa Bazos (hosted at Station Art Gallery in Whitby, Ontario)

October 2014:   Pearl Earbobs published in Renaissance Anthology

September 26, 2014:  Public reading at Words of the Season/Culture Days event

September 2014:  — Words of the Season Meets Ontario Culture Days published in The Word Weaver

July 2014:  contributor to A Rewording Life

July 7 2014:   Summer Slam audition judge for the Writers’ Community of Durham Region

June 14 2014: Pearl Earbobs:  Selected by Sarah Selecky as third place The Writers’ of Durham Region short story competition

“This story is beautifully written, and I read it several times, admiring the craftsmanship – confident, strong, with sophisticated depth and design. I recognized the first sentence, of course (the prompt) but it was the rest of the opening paragraph that gripped me. The stakes are life and death, the voice is honest and authentic, the language sepia-tinted from history, and the drama is real.” Sarah Selecky